Chicago Women’s Club

I started this back in April. The course of research is often a serious rabbit hole. It’s worse when working without a deadline for you have the leisure to make strands into ropes. Today, though I found the knot at the end of it. Or so I thought…

A few months ago, I pulled out a small Hollinger box of vintage paper I’d been saving. I hoped each would find a home on Ebay or Etsy. I listed some. They went nowhere. The slick, grey box looks chic and minimalist. It lives under my coffee table.

Today I took another look….

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Finding Presidents in Unusual Places

Gino's NorthUPDATE: Scroll all the way down down to see the latest!

I sort of regularly grab a cocktail at a little place called Gino’s North. It’s in Edgewater, a few doors east of the Granville L stop.

Back in the early ’40’s founder and and restaurateur Frank Meltiades dreamed of having a swanky cocktail lounge. When the space became available, he opened the Snow Drop Lounge. The lounge was named after the Per Hasselberg statue, Snöcklackan. Frank picked out this reproduction to grace the bar and she’s lived here since.

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Chicago Department of Transportation Reuses!

I was walking west on Howard St.  Lost in thought, I wondered “where am I?”  I looked up and saw “Winchesown”

Well, I think I saw Winchester..

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Cleaning up Louis Sullivan…Or Not

2 April 2019

I love it when my ethics get me out of doing something I don’t want to do.

We have a dark-as-ebony fragment from the former Chicago Stock Exchange building. It lives in my office. It’s not on the sales floor-on purpose.

The Stock Exchange was demolished in 1972. It was designed by famed Chicago architect Louis Sullivan. There are fragments of it all over the nation. I have seen them at museums in Milwaukee, Minnesota, and New York.

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Suffragette City

1 April 2019

Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and sometimes Lucretia Mott get all the suffragette love. But we had a Chicago woman who was just as invested in the future of women in America.

Myra Bradwell was the first woman admitted to the Illinois bar, founder and publisher of the Chicago Legal News, largely responsible for Mary Lincoln’s release from Bellevue Place and a suffragette.

She’s buried here in Chicago at Rosehill Cemetery. Last weekend, I left her a little token to thank her for all her work.

Every woman must remember we’ve been allowed to do this for less than 100 years. People lose rights all the time. We must be vigilant and use it or we could lose it. OWM fear us, and they should.